Fibromyalgia Pain

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Fibromyalgia Pain

Whether you are experiencing painful tender points, deep muscle pain, chronic headaches, unending back pain, or neck pain, you know how fibromyalgia feels. People with fibromyalgia experience pain in ways no one else can fully understand.
Please bear with the following information as it is a complex subject which results in a complex discussion.

What Is Pain?

Pain is an uncomfortable feeling in your body that warns you something is wrong. While this feeling is the body’s way of alerting your brain that there is a problem, after it goes on for weeks or even months, pain becomes a part of your very existence. At that point, not only is pain a symptom that something is wrong, but pain becomes the disease itself.

What Is Fibromyalgia-Related Pain?

Fibromyalgia-related pain is pain that causes you to ache/hurt all over. You may have painful “trigger points,” places on your body that hurt no matter what medication you take. Your muscles may feel like they have been overworked or pulled even though you haven’t exercised. Sometimes, your muscles will twitch. Other times they will burn or ache with deep stabbing pain. Some patients with fibromyalgia have pain and achiness around the joints in their neck, shoulders, back, and hips. This kind of pain makes it difficult to sleep or exercise.

How Does the Brain Perceive Pain?

There are roughly 20 different kinds of nerve endings in your skin that tell you if something is hot, cold, or painful. These nerve endings convert mechanical, thermal, or chemical energy into electrical signals that convey information to the brain and spinal cord – also known as the central nervous system or CNS. These signals travel to areas of your CNS where you perceive the stimuli as the painful sensations you actually feel sensations such as searing, burning, pounding, or throbbing.

Research suggests that the pain associated with fibromyalgia is caused by a “glitch” in the way the body processes pain. This glitch results in a hypersensitivity to stimuli that normally are not painful. According to the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), research has shown that people with fibromyalgia have reduced blood flow to parts of the brain that normally help the body deal with pain.

Is Fibromyalgia Pain Acute or Chronic?

Acute pain comes on suddenly and can be severe. For instance, think about how suddenly your back can ache after you’ve bent down to lift a heavy package or a child. Yet, in more than 80% of cases, acute pain goes away in about two weeks. It runs its course and disappears as the problem is relieved. If your pain from a strained muscle lasts only a few days or weeks, it is considered acute.Chronic pain is pain that lasts much longer than someone would normally expect based on the original problem or injury. When pain becomes chronic, our bodies react in several ways. Chronic pain may be associated with abnormalities in brain hormones, low energy, mood disorders, muscle pain, and impaired mental and physical performance. As neurochemical changes in your body increase your sensitivity to pain, the chronic pain worsens. You begin to have pain in other parts of the body that do not normally hurt.

Fibromyalgia Pain – WebMD

 

Types of Fibromyalgia Pain

Types of Pain

The first three types of fibromyalgia pain are medically defined:

  • Hyperalgesia
  • Allodynia
  • Painful Paresthesia

Hyperalgesia

“Hyper” means excess and “algesia” means pain. Hyperalgesia is the medical term for pain amplification in FMS. Our brains appear to take normal pain signals and “turn up the volume,” making them more severe than they would normally be.  Most of the drugs used for managing FMS pain are aimed, at least in part, at reducing hyperalgesia.

Allodynia

Is your skin painful to the touch? A symptom that perplexes a lot of us is allodynia. That’s what it’s called when mild pressure from clothing or gentle massage causes pain.

A lot people describe allodynia as similar to a bad sunburn.

Allodynia is a fairly rare type of pain — other than FMS, it’s only associated with a handful of conditions, including neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia (shingles) and migraine.

Allodynia is believed to be a hypersensitive reaction that may result from the central sensitization associated with FMS. The pain signals originate with specialized nerves, called nociceptors, that sense information about things like temperature and painful stimuli right from the skin.

Painful Paresthesia

Paresthesias are odd nerve sensations that can feel like crawling, tingling, burning, itching or numbness. Sometimes, these sensations can be painful. Paresthsias are also associated with peripheral neuropathy, chemotherapy drugs, multiple sclerosis and migraine.

Many common FMS treatments can help alleviate paresthesia-related pain, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs).

Some people also have good luck with vitamin B12, capsaicin cream, massage and acupuncture.

Other Catagories
Other Fibromyalgia Pain Catagories

These are definitely worth a mention as they are very accurate. Please take a moment to read them as they can very well help you to describe the different pains we experience. You also may consider to subscribe to Adrienne Dwello‘s letters and bookmark her website. She is a wealth of information and completely understands firbromyalgia.

Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue

 

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